Tag Archives: mental toughness

42: Jimmy Pedro on What Makes a Champion, New Rules, and the Future of Judo

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Jimmy Pedro is an American judo competitor and coach, World champion, 3x World medalist, 2x Olympic medalist; we talk about his father (Big Jim Pedro Sr), his early career, the times he wanted to quit, overcoming a neck injury, coming back from retirement, the life of an athlete vs the life of a coach, a system for developing elite-level judoka, Japanese vs Russian judo, periodization, a weekly program for an elite-level judoka, toughest moment as a coach, watching Travis Stevens lose the semifinals at the Olympics, mental game, visualization, IJF, judo as a spectator sport, the future of judo in the United States and the rest of the world, and more.

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Full Video Interview on YouTube

Jimmy Pedro Quotes (from Podcast)

On failure and doubt:

“Every champion wants to quit… At 19, I lost at the Kano Cup, went 0-2. I remember sitting on the steps of the Budokan, thinking to myself: I hate this sport, I just want to quit, this stinks.  People see champions as winners, but they don’t see those dark days, the days when they struggled or they lost or they failed or the day in training when they got their butt whooped or those tournaments where they fought miserably. We all go through it. Nobody goes undefeated.”

On never quitting on the mat:

“I’ve never been broken in a judo match. I’ve never quit. I’ve fought some guys who were tough as nails. I’ve had to fight for my life. But I’ve never backed down. I might’ve been beaten, but I went out fighting.”

On strategy:

“We know we can’t beat the Russians, the French, the Brazilians, the Japanese by doing more judo than they do. They have way more people to train with, way more opportunity. So we have to beat them with physicality, strategy, gripping, newaza, conditioning, toughness, and the mindset that we are going to win.”

Links

39: Frank “Gorilla Hulk” Molinaro on Mental Toughness, Visualization, and Mastery of a Technique

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Frank Molinaro aka Gorilla Hulk is the 2012 NCAA Wrestling Champion, and a 4-time NCAA Division-I All-American; we talk about World Team Trials, last second victory, his day-to-day routine, diet, Vitamix, rehabbing injuries, sauna, cutting weight, leg killer video, cardio circuits, drilling, play wrestling, mastering a technique, 2011 NCAA finals match against Kyle Dake, wrestling the NCAA tournament through an injury, visualization, confidence, matches that haunt him, mental toughness, married life, coaching, and more.

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Video: What It Takes to Win a National Championship

Full Audio of Interview on YouTube

Quotes

Frank on what it takes to win an NCAA championship:

“You can’t just want to win a national championship. You have to see it every day in your head. You have to expect it to happen. When I made it to my first national finals, I was going in with the attitude that I’m going to wrestle 100% and I was going to make it happen, and that’s not how you win at the highest level. So I changed my approach the year after. I visualized winning probably 100 times a day, wrote it down first thing in the morning, had it on my phone, had it on my walls, had it on my locker. So when it happened it wasn’t a crazy jump up and down reaction, it was something that I expected to happen. My junior year I can honestly say I didn’t expect it to happen. I thought it could happen. But there’s a huge difference between when you want something to happen and you truly 100% believe something is going to happen.”

Frank on what it takes to be a winner:

“What it comes down is how badly do you want to win and what you’re willing to do.”

Frank on losing:

“Losing is something that I’ll never be able to get used to. I take losses very seriously. Losing will put me into depression for two weeks. I question everything in my life. I question what the heck I’m doing. I did this wrong. I did that wrong. So, I know how painful losing is every time I step on the mat and how badly I want to win. The moment you start to tolerate losing, you’re not going to reach your potential.”

Links

 

30: Brad Court and Tim Carpenter on the Big Bang Theory, Mental Toughness, Steroids, Injury and Health Insurance

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In episode 30, I talk with Brad Court and Tim Carpenter about injury, surgery, health insurance, steroids in combat sports, witch burning, a one-legged wrestler, science, Neil deGrasse Tyson, the Big Bang theory, evolution, Louis CK, God, Kron Gracie, Scotty Nelson, Open Mat Radio, the Save Jiu Jitsu movement, Paramount BJJ, coaching, fear, competition mindset, and more.

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or RSS, and check out our facebook page.

Quotes

Tim Carpenter showing a bit of skepticism about the overly simplistic theory of the Big Bang:

“The problem with science is that it’s done by people. There’s no way around that. So it’s all got a little bias in there.”

Tim Carpenter on sport jiu jitsu:

“I like berimbolo. I like doing that stuff when I’m training. The problem is: those moves don’t work on an unskilled opponent. You try to do the berimbolo on a white belt, it probably won’t work. It only works on guys that will give you a high level reaction. You can practice berimbolo all you want, but what are you going to do when a guy just punches you in the face. Next thing you know you have a guy in your half guard, and he is biting your cheek.”

Brad on submission-only tournaments:

“A lot of people are afraid to get submitted. I don’t know how else to explain why all these submission-only tournaments are so small.  Because that’s the most prestigious thing to me. If you submit everyone in your weight division, that’s the ultimate.”

Brad on self-defense and street jiu jitsu:

“The problem is there are people starting jiu jitsu with their foundation being berimbolo. The foundation has to be in self defense.”

Brad on cornering Tim’s first fight:

“He said that one of the first things he thought when he was in there is: ‘Why am I doing this?'”

Tim on a part of him wanting to enforce the requirement of fighting for receiving a black belt:

“If I’m ever going to give a black belt out, the person has to go out and get into a fight.”

Tim on giving good book recommendations to Brad:

“All the great things in Brad’s life have come from me.”

Brad on a way to approach competition that removes some of the pressure of winning:

“I try to remind my students and myself is that getting better is more important than winning, especially when you’re at white belt, blue belt, purple belt, brown belt.”

Brad on being realistic, but doing everything with conviction:

“Do everything you do with conviction. If you’re going to shoot a double leg, shoot a double leg, blast through them. Don’t think ‘watch out for the guillotine. That’s different than being over-confident. To me ‘over-confident’ is a guy who didn’t train properly.”

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2: Hero Worship and the Resolute Acceptance of Death

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tim-carpenterIn episode 2, Lex and Tim talk about Miyamoto Musashi, the iTunes explicit rating, hero worship, the value of getting punched in the face, fear of losing, learning from fighting, battling to the death in West Philly, hipsters at the Piazza, Sex at Dawn, A Book of Five Rings, romantic relationship with jiu jitsu, risk aversion, karate vs wrestling, breaking your opponent, training mental toughness, and not giving any respect to your opponent even if your opponent is Roger Gracie.

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Here are links to some of the stuff mentioned in this episode: