Tag Archives: education

29: AnnMaria De Mars on Raising Ronda Rousey, Aggressive Judo, Math Education, and the Value of Hard Work

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In episode 29, I talk with AnnMaria De Mars about being the first American to win the Judo World Championship, raising four kids one of whom is Ronda Rousey the current UFC champion,  getting four degrees including a PhD in applied statistics, her book Winning on the Ground, her blog, her grandmother’s advice, the passing of her husband, the absurdity of sport, coaching an elite level athlete, balancing academics and sport, Ronda’s 2007 World Silver and Olympic Bronze and her matches against Edith Bosch, refusing to lose, being a woman in a combat sport, teaching kids math through computer games at 7 Generation Games, math (and hard work) as an important foundation for long-term success in life, and more.

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Edit: I wrote a blog post with some post-interview takeaways.

Quotes

AnnMaria on the advice her grandmother gave her:

“Do the best you can with everything you were given. She really believed that quote in the Bible: ‘To whom much is given, much is expected.'”

AnnMaria on being asked if she is afraid of death:

“No, I can think of a lot worse things than death. One of the reasons people are afraid of dying is they have regrets. They haven’t done the things they want to do. Because my husband passed away when I was young, that changed the way I thought about things. He was a great guy, worked hard his whole life. There were a lot of things he wanted to do that he never got around to doing because he always thought there would be time later. So now when I want to do something, I do it.  When I look back, I’ve had a lot of accomplishments and experiences in education, academics, I published scientific articles, I wrote a book with Jimmy Pedro Sr, I have wonderful children, so if I died right now I have no regrets. You want to live like you might die tomorrow, because you might die tomorrow.”

AnnMaria on the absurdity of dedicating years of your life to achieving a singular goal like winning a World Championship:

“You have to be smart enough to do it and dumb enough to believe it’s important.”

AnnMaria on what it takes to be successful in judo or in math or in anything:

“You get good at something by doing a lot of it.”

AnnMaria on trash talking:

“Like Dr. Seuss said, ‘Be who you are and say what you mean. Because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind!'”

AnnMaria on what will go on her tombstone:

“I’m smarter than I look.”

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12: Ricardo Migliarese on the Lion and the Fox

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ricardo-migliarese-take-it-uneasy-podcastIn episode 12, Tim and I talk to Ricardo Migliarese, 3rd degree BJJ black belt, head instructor of Balance Studios in Philadelphia. Ricardo talks about growing up in Philly, bullying, parenting, ADHD medication, the education system, the influence of his father and his recent passing, his close relationship with his brother Phil, how he and Tim met, Tim’s first words, the Hellfish International In-House tournament, competing at Worlds and Pan Ams, going for submissions, explosiveness, recovering from injury, competition training, not taking things too seriously, serving the role of a psychiatrist, the 100 rep workout, and all throughout Machiavelli’s The Prince, the lion, the fox, the gorilla, the orangutan, and the turtle.

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Video Clips

Quotes

Ricardo on his simple rule for success and happiness:

“There’s two things you get to do in life: things you want to do and things you don’t want to do. And I advise always to do the things you don’t want to do first, so you can enjoy the things that you want to do.”

Tim Carpenter on the early days of his friendship with Ricardo:

“I don’t like anybody when I first meet them. Everybody starts off at zero. You got to build your way up.”

Ricardo  on  the role that explosiveness has in his jiu jitsu:

“You never see a race car driver use the nitro straight off the bat. It’s futile to do that. You start a match, you slow it down, and at the right time when you need it, use it… When used correctly, it becomes a valid weapon.”

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